An Alternative History of Photography: Works from the Solander Collection

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Open: Mon-Wed & Sat 10am-6pm, Thu-Fri 10am-8pm, Sun 11am-6pm

16 - 18 Ramillies St, W1F 7LW, London, UK
Open: Mon-Wed & Sat 10am-6pm, Thu-Fri 10am-8pm, Sun 11am-6pm


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An Alternative History of Photography: Works from the Solander Collection

to Sun 19 Feb 2023

16 - 18 Ramillies St, W1F 7LW An Alternative History of Photography: Works from the Solander Collection

Mon-Wed & Sat 10am-6pm, Thu-Fri 10am-8pm, Sun 11am-6pm


New ways of looking at the traditions and timelines of photography

The history of photography is often told as a chain of relationships connecting one great maker to the next. However, the real history is much more complicated: it is a vast web of interconnected stories stretching from East Asia to West Africa, and from New Zealand to Uzbekistan, and a complex interchange of fine art, scientific, anthropological, documentary and amateur traditions

With over 130 works from the Solander Collection, An Alternative History of Photography invites you to look again at well known works and new discoveries by major artists, alongside forgotten greats, regional champions and unknown artists.

Unexpected images by legendary figures including Ansel Adams, Diane Arbus, Robert Frank, Man Ray and Edward Weston, are paired with work by Helen Stuart and John Lindt, early, self-trained practitioner Lady Augusta Mostyn, and African studio photographers Sanlé Sory, Michel Kameni and Malick Sidibé.

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This exhibition is curated by Phillip Prodger and oganised by Curatorial Exhibitions in collaboration with The Photographers’ Gallery. The exhibition is accompanied by a major new book, published by Prestel.

About the Solander Collection
Dedicated to the enjoyment and understanding of photographic art in all its forms, the Solander Collection has a special emphasis on international traditions, under-represented and forgotten artists, ethnic diversity and women. The aim of the collection is to broaden the understanding of photography as inclusive and democratic.

Helen Stuart, Portrait of a Maori Woman, Ronika Ruke, also known as Auntry Ruku, with moko kauae or ta moko (chin tattoo) and huia (feather head-dress). Courtesy of the Solander Collection


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