Danie Mellor: redux

, ,
Open: Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 1pm-4pm

Level 4, 104 Exhibition St., VIC 3000, Melbourne, Australia
Open: Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 1pm-4pm


Visit    

Danie Mellor: redux

Melbourne

Danie Mellor: redux
to Sat 21 May 2022
Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 1pm-4pm
Artist: Danie Mellor

Part of the PHOTO 2022 international festival of photography exhibition program

Artworks

The dialectic gaze, 2022

Collection of 41 framed works. Chromogenic prints on metallic photographic paper, photographic prints on mirror polished steel, gesso and iridescent wash, picture shelves
280 x 240 cm [approx.]
Unique

contact gallery

Again forever, 2022

Chromogenic print on metallic photographic paper face-mounted to clear acrylic
124 x 283.5 cm overall, two panels 124 x 146.9cm and 124 x 137.1 cm
Edition of 3 + 2AP

contact gallery

redux, 2022

Photographic print on mirror polished stainless steel
143 x 139.5 cm [irregular]
Edition of 3 + 2AP

contact gallery

The far country, 2022

Chromogenic print on metallic photographic paper face-mounted to clear acrylic
180 x 240 cm overall, two panels each 180 x 120 cm
Edition of 3 + 2AP

contact gallery

The riverbend (balan yuralbarra), 2022

Chromogenic print on metallic photographic paper
188 x 116 cm
Edition of 3 + 2AP

contact gallery

The emerald forest (bala dulgul), 2022

Chromogenic print on metallic photographic paper
118 x 204 cm
Edition of 3 + 2AP

contact gallery

The persistent light (bala yubanday), 2022

Chromogenic print on metallic photographic paper
188 x 116 cm
Edition of 3 + 2AP

contact gallery

Added to list

Done

Removed

Tolarno Danie Mellor 1

Tolarno Danie Mellor 2

Tolarno Danie Mellor 3

Tolarno Danie Mellor 4

Tolarno Danie Mellor 5

Images have a powerful way of revealing connections between disparate histories and experiences. redux is an exhibition that assembles, re-assembles and sequences parallel and divergent narratives, curating archival and recent infra-red and visible light photographs in a way that evokes a pictorial and studied chronology. History repeats itself and redux intimates we are part of those cycles.
It is a reminder as well of the often-violent displacement of Aboriginal people and knowledge systems, with colonial enterprise failing to acknowledge the value of cultural systems embedded in story, Dreaming and Country. The ecological destruction portrayed in many of the images is an uncanny reminder of our current global and environmental impacts, and contrasts acutely with intact rainforest ecologies.
The exhibition is one that emphasises reflection, literally and metaphorically. A selection of photographs is printed on polished mirror steel surfaces, the viewer reflected and brought into the work as witness to changes and experience in and on our landscapes. Other more traditionally presented pieces ask questions through dialectic and considered placement, their relationship and conversation with one another growing a sense of history and connection.
redux aligns the splintered narratives of past and present into an exhibition of both large and intimately scaled photographic works, with landscape and people remembered and acknowledged.

– Danie Mellor, 2022

Danie Mellor is a contemporary Australian artist whose multidisciplinary practice explores the intersections of contemporary and historic culture. In considering Australia’s recent and ancient past, his work traverses the breadth of those narratives in relation to global art histories. Mellor’s revaluation of iconic landscape traditions is informed by his connection to place through Aboriginal heritage, and ongoing preoccupation with Australia’s landspace.

Tyson Yunkaporta is an Australian academic, arts critic and researcher, who belongs to the Apalech Clan in far north Queensland. He is the author of Sand Talk: How Indigenous Thinking Can Save the World (Text Publishing, 2019), as well as being a published poet and carver of traditional tools and weapons. Yunkaporta is a senior research fellow and founder of the Indigenous Knowledge Systems Lab at Deakin University in Melbourne. He applies Indigenous thinking to issues that scientists and technologists are currently working on across economics, governance, evolutionary dynamics, cognition and the environment.

Courtesy of the artist and Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne


more to explore:

 
 

By using GalleriesNow.net you agree to our use of cookies to enhance your experience. Close