Dhewadi Hadjab: Acte I : Vaciller

, ,
Open: Tue-Sat 11am-7pm

6, rue du Pont de Lodi, 75006, Paris, France
Open: Tue-Sat 11am-7pm


Visit    

Dhewadi Hadjab: Acte I : Vaciller

to Sat 8 Oct 2022

Artist: Dhewadi Hadjab

6, rue du Pont de Lodi, 75006 Dhewadi Hadjab: Acte I : Vaciller

Tue-Sat 11am-7pm


version française ici

“For me, dance has always been a site of curiosity. But what interests me in dance is the moment of failure, the instant in which the pose comes undone, when the posture breaks down, when the body trembles as it searches for the right gesture. I find this the sincerest movement,” says Dhewadi Hadjab, whose imagination has been fed by videos including those of Pina Bausch, whom he particularly likes.

Artworks

Untitled, 2022

Oil on canvas
200 x 145 cm (78.74 x 57.09 in.)
© Dhewadi Hadjab. Courtesy the artist and kamel mennour, Paris. Photo. Archives kamel mennour

contact gallery

Untitled, 2022

Oil on canvas
36 x 30 cm (14.17 x 11.81 in.)
© Dhewadi Hadjab. Courtesy the artist and kamel mennour, Paris. Photo. Archives kamel mennour

contact gallery

Untitled, 2022

Oil on canvas
24 x 19 cm (9.45 x 7.48 in.)
© Dhewadi Hadjab. Courtesy the artist and kamel mennour, Paris. Photo. Archives kamel mennour

contact gallery

Untitled, 2022

Oil on canvas
310 x 240 cm (122.05 x 94.49 in.)
© Dhewadi Hadjab. Courtesy the artist and kamel mennour, Paris. Photo. Archives kamel mennour

contact gallery

Untitled, 2022

Oil on canvas
180 x 145 cm (70.87 x 57.09 in.) 180 x 145 cm (70.87 x 57.09 in.) 180 x 145 cm (70.87 x 57.09 in.)
© Dhewadi Hadjab. Courtesy the artist and kamel mennour, Paris. Photo. Archives kamel mennour

contact gallery

Untitled, 2022

Oil on canvas
240 x 190 cm (94.49 x 74.8 in.)
© Dhewadi Hadjab. Courtesy the artist and kamel mennour, Paris. Photo. Archives kamel mennour

contact gallery

Untitled, 2022

Oil on canvas
44 x 33 cm (17.32 x 12.99 in.)
© Dhewadi Hadjab. Courtesy the artist and kamel mennour, Paris. Photo. Archives kamel mennour

contact gallery

Untitled, 2022

Oil on canvas
290 x 230 cm (114 x 90 in.)
© Dhewadi Hadjab. Courtesy the artist and kamel mennour, Paris. Photo. Archives kamel mennour

contact gallery

Untitled, 2022

Oil on canvas
50 x 40 cm (19.69 x 15.75 in.)
© Dhewadi Hadjab. Courtesy the artist and kamel mennour, Paris. Photo. Archives kamel mennour

contact gallery

Added to list

Done

Removed

His interest in the choreographed body first came out of a friendship he had with a dancer in Algeria. Since then, it has become an obsession. To the point that every painting is the occasion to think about the lines of the next body—during the long hours he spends on a canvas, Dhewadi Hadjab sometimes moves off to rapidly sketch new poses and figures in preparatory sketchbooks. These intuitive postures then become the starting point for a series of long photographic sessions in which Hadjab patiently guides his model, adjusting the light and shadow as it falls. Even though they are often professional dancers, his models can’t hold the uncomfortable architecture of their pose for more than a few seconds. The sessions are trying, with the body brought to the limit of its sense of balance and pain. From among the many photos taken in the process, Hadjab extracts each tiny detail that he will then work into his paintings: a particular shimmer of satin, an imperceptible tension in a muscle beneath the skin, the angle of a finger, the stirring limit of a shadow… Hadjab adds together hundreds and hundreds of separate instants in order to fix a single moment of silence.

Dhewadi Hadjab’s paintings should be thought of as chapters in a story made of hours rather than words. He embraces the aspect of theatrical construction that belongs to them. With his brush in hand, he is a choreographer and stage director, the different spaces he imagines like sets inhabited by bodies in one suspended, sublime moment. The influence of Renaissance and Romantic painting is everywhere in his work. He serenely summons forth the light of a Caravaggio or the clarity of David’s draped figures. When he depicts a parquetry floor—an element that often undergirds the scene and structures the painting—he emphasises its repetitive pattern, which punctuates the painting like a rhythm, marking the painting with a tempo, something that again is necessary for dancers. The works are always ‘untitled’. Dhewadi feels that what he shows says enough. The rest is up to us. Like the strange feeling, on seeing a new triptych showing only the bottom of a pair of legs in white socks, of a meeting between Francis Bacon and La Mort de Marat (Jacques-Louis David, 1793).

Here, the body hides. As single as ever, it has gone over to the other side, hidden from our gaze. We have no idea if it’s taunting us, whether it’s playing or dying. The demigod Dhewadi refrains from imposing an interpretation on the image. But he describes this triptych as a moment in which the sea swells, then draws off from the beach. Another movement from dance…

A graduate of the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, but first trained at the École des Beaux-Arts in Algiers, he has doubtless kept within him the brown earth and the sparse, chiseled vegetation of his childhood. But there is no landscape to be found in his paintings, which rather try to cut us off from the world, from time, leading us astray through the meandering patterns of a peeling sheet of wallpaper or a richly detailed carpet. In his paintings, everything is built on contrast. Colours fall alongside one another like rays of light. Shadows are almost never closed, but rather outline the volumes in space and create astonishing reality effects. The bodies pay no attention to us; in the theatrical space they inhabit they never look at us but seem to thoroughly live out the question they address to themselves and to us: how to communicate ecstasy, impossible love? How to communicate a trance, how to communicate the moment when the body stops being controlled and is given over to itself, how to communicate when the fiction of painting turns an instant into eternity?

– Gaël Charbau

Born in 1992 in M’Sila (Algeria), DHEWADI HADJAB lives and works in Paris. Graduated from the École Supérieure des Beaux-Arts d’Alger, the École Nationale Supérieure d’Art de Bourges and the Beaux- Arts de Paris, he was awarded several intenational prizes such as the Prix des Amis des Beaux-Arts « Prix du portrait Bertrand de Demandolx-Dedons » in 2020. In 2021, he was the laureate of the Rubis Mécénat production grant and was invited to present a solo exhibition at the Église Saint-Eustache in Paris. His work has been shown in group exhibitions at FRAC Franche-Comté, Besançon (France), at POUSH Manifesto, Clichy (France) and at the Beaux-Arts de Paris.

Surprising and disconcerting, the paintings of Dhewadi Hadjab are of intriguing beauty. Photography and pictorial practice are both at the center of his work. All of the artist’s canvases begin with photographs of models that he places in positions of extreme discomfort, constraint, in danger. It is then, in the extremely meticulous execution of the painted surface and in the development of a powerful realism that he accentuates the smallest details of the bodies and gives them a strong sculptural intensity.

These vibrant, intense and unique paintings, between gravity and grace, are an invitation to transcend the sensitive and the fragility of uncertainty.


« La danse a toujours été pour moi un terrain de curiosité. Mais dans la danse, c’est ce moment d’échec qui m’intéresse, l’instant où la pose se défait, où la posture est cassée, où le corps tremble en cherchant le bon geste. Je trouve que c’est le mouvement le plus sincère » explique Dhewadi Hadjab, dont l’imaginaire est nourri de vidéos, notamment celles de Pina Bausch, qu’il apprécie particulièrement. Cet intérêt pour le corps chorégraphié est né en Algérie, d’une amitié avec une danseuse. C’est devenu pour lui depuis, une obsession. À tel point que chaque peinture est l’occasion de penser à l’écriture du corps suivant : durant ces longues heures d’exécutions des tableaux, Dhewadi Hadjab s’écarte parfois de sa tâche pour dessiner rapidement des poses et des figures nouvelles, dans des carnets préparatoires. Ces postures intuitives deviennent le point de départ de longues séances photos, où l’artiste guide patiemment son modèle et ajuste les ombres et les lumières qui s’y creusent. Bien que souvent danseuses et danseurs, ses modèles ne peuvent tenir plus de quelques secondes leurs architectures inconfortables : les séances sont éprouvantes, le corps touchant la limite de l’équilibre et de la douleur. Des dizaines de clichés sont ainsi créés. Dhewadi Hadjab extrait ensuite de chacun d’eux chaque infime détail qu’il travaille dans ses tableaux : un reflet particulier du satin, la tension imperceptible d’un muscle sous la peau, l’angle d’un doigt, la limite émouvante d’une ombre… Pour figer un moment de silence, l’artiste additionne des centaines et des centaines d’instants.

Ses différentes toiles, il faudrait les envisager comme les chapitres d’une histoire qui n’a pas de mots, mais des heures. L’artiste en assume la construction théâtrale. Pinceau à la main, Dhewadi Hadjab est un chorégraphe et un metteur en scène : les différents espaces qu’il imagine sont comme des plateaux habités par des corps, un temps suspendu, sublime. L’influence de la grande peinture est omniprésente. Il convoque sans rougir la lumière du Caravage ou la clarté des drapés de David. Quand il représente un parquet, qui va souvent asseoir la scène et structurer le tableau, c’est pour son motif répétitif qui vient scander la peinture comme un rythme et marquer la toile d’un tempo, encore une fois nécessaire aux danseurs. Les oeuvres sont toujours « sans titre », car Dhewadi estime en dire assez par ce qu’il montre. Le reste nous appartient. Comme de voir par exemple ce nouveau triptyque qui ne présente que l’extrémité de jambes couvertes de chaussettes blanches, cette étrange sensation de rencontre entre un Francis Bacon et La Mort de Marat (Jacques-Louis David, 1793). Le corps, ici, se dérobe. Toujours aussi célibataire, il est passé de l’autre côté, caché des regards. On ne sait s’il nous nargue, s’il joue ou s’il expire. Le démiurge Dhewadi se garde bien d’imposer une lecture. Mais il décrit ce triptyque comme un moment où la mer monte, puis s’éloigne de la plage. Encore un mouvement de danse…

Sorti des Beaux-Arts de Paris, mais d’abord formé aux Beaux-Arts d’Alger, l’artiste a sans doute gardé de son enfance ces terres brunes, cette végétation éparse et ciselée. Aucun paysage toutefois dans son oeuvre, qui cherche au contraire à nous couper du monde, à nous couper du temps, pour nous perdre dans les méandres des motifs d’une tapisserie décollée du mur ou d’un tapis flanqué de riches détails. Dans ses oeuvres, tout est construit sur le contraste. Les couleurs se côtoient comme des rayons de lumière. L’ombre n’est presque jamais bouchée, mais souligne les volumes et provoque de stupéfiants effets de réels. Les corps ne nous prêtent aucune attention, dans l’espace théâtral qu’ils habitent, ils ne nous regardent jamais mais semblent vivre entièrement la question qu’ils se posent, qu’ils nous posent : comment dire l’extase, comment dire l’amour impossible ? Comment dire la transe, comment dire, quand le corps n’est plus gouverné mais livré lui-même, comment dire, quand l’instant devient par la fiction de la peinture, l’éternité ?

– Gaël Charbau

Né en 1992 à M’Sila (Algérie), DHEWADI HADJAB vit et travaille à Paris. Diplômé de l’École Supérieure des Beaux-Arts d’Alger, de l’École Nationale Supérieure d’Art de Bourges et des Beaux-Arts de Paris, il a été récompensé par plusieurs prix internationaux tels que le Prix des Amis des Beaux-Arts « Prix du portrait Bertrand de Demandolx-Dedons » en 2020. En 2021, il est le lauréat de l’aide à la production Rubis Mécénat et est invité à présenter une exposition personnelle à l’Église Saint-Eustache, Paris. Ses oeuvres ont été montrées dans des expositions collectives au FRAC Franche-Comté, Besançon (France), à POUSH Manifesto, Clichy (France) et aux Beaux-Arts de Paris.

Surprenantes et désarçonnantes, les peintures de Dhewadi Hadjab sont d’une intrigante beauté. La photographie et la pratique picturale sont conjointement au coeur de l’oeuvre de l’artiste. Toutes les toiles commencent en effet par des photographies de modèles qu’il place dans des positions d’extrême inconfort, de contrainte ou de mise en danger. C’est ensuite par le biais d’une exécution minutieuse dans l’oeuvre peinte et la mise en place d’un réalisme puissant que l’artiste accentue les moindres détails de ces corps en mouvement, et leur confère une grande intensité sculpturale.

Cette peinture vibrante, forte et unique, entre pesanteur et grâce, est une invitation à transcender le sensible et la fragilité de l’incertitude.

Exhibition views « Dhewadi Hadjab, Acte I : Vaciller », kamel mennour (6 rue du Pont de Lodi, Paris 6), 2022 © Dhewadi Hadjab. Courtesy the artist and kamel mennour, Paris. Photo. Archives kamel mennour


more to explore:

 
 

By using GalleriesNow.net you agree to our use of cookies to enhance your experience. Close