Samara Scott: BRIM

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Open: Wed-Sat noon-6pm

117-119 South Lambeth Road, SW8 1XA, London, UK
Open: Wed-Sat noon-6pm


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Samara Scott: BRIM

London

Samara Scott: BRIM
to Sat 30 Oct 2021
Wed-Sat noon-6pm
Artist: Samara Scott

The Sunday Painter presents BRIM, Samara Scott’s second solo exhibition at the gallery.

Artworks

Bruises I, 2021

Giclée and C-type print on archival paper
129cm x 119cm

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Bruises II, 2021

Giclée and C-type print on archival paper
109cm x 82cm

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Bruises III, 2021

Giclée and C-type print on archival paper
120cm x 78cm

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Bruises IV, 2021

Giclée and C-type print on archival paper
44cm x 71cm

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Bruises V, 2021

Giclée and C-type print on archival paper
60.5cm x 64cm

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Bruises VI, 2021

Giclée and C-type print on archival paper
84cm x 71.5cm

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Bruises VII, 2021

Giclée and C-type print on archival paper
51.5cm x 74cm

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The Sunday Painter Samara Scott 1

The Sunday Painter Samara Scott 2

The Sunday Painter Samara Scott 3

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The Sunday Painter Samara Scott 6

The Sunday Painter Samara Scott 7

The Sunday Painter Samara Scott 8

The Sunday Painter Samara Scott 9

The Sunday Painter Samara Scott 10

A suspended gridded ceiling hung strangely low fills a void where a ground floor might have been. Pockets of colour and islands of chaos within the otherwise regimented desert-like surface of fibrous ceiling tiles. Bottles, polythene bags filled, smashed glass, pools of thick lurid liquids, cables, sheets of paper, phone chargers, (all the kind of stuff that procreates in your disorganized miscellaneous drawer) coming in and out of focus and inhabiting a number of the tiles in a strange illogical composition; small remnants from the aftermath of some domestic apocalypse.

There is a subtle permeating smell; a semi-recognizable cocktail of synthetic and organic aromas seeping through the cosmetic ‘skin’ of the ceiling, a barrier designed to hide something deemed unsightly. The sterilizing effect here though is leaking, the squares of mess now elevated, allowing fractured light to pour through. They’ve become glowing portals, permitting views from an impossible angle. They are smothering, suffocating, and unnaturally close – there’s a sense of pressure and gravity at work, contemporary fossils set within an archeological slab. Within Samara’s work objects and materials melt into a different realms; the plastic bags seen from below now take on the form of delicate nebulous whilst simultaneously having to act as geographic barriers separating an ocean of oily detergent from an arid cracked landscape of dried out 0% Fat Yogurt. The sense of precariousness is always present in Samara’s work; both in her process and the resulting installations. It’s an endurance act flipping from an itching desire to install order and stability into an impossible set of circumstances to a relenting in the slippages that occur, and the inevitable forces of entropy.

An image bank of photographs presents snapshots, spanning over 10 years all taken on a point-and-shoot and edited down from thousands of others in close collaboration with Berry Patten. The spaces within in the photographs are the crevices, gutters, causeways, adverts, and transient non-places; that make up the seams within our increasingly saturated environment. Landscapes seen through smashed windows, a melted car windscreen of an abandoned car, flowers shrouded under blue polythene, tire marks etching through a slushy earth, a green tarpaulin floating down a brown river. There is often a warring taking place between the natural and un-natural as things fight for space, clambering, polluting and leaking into one another. In isolation some of them are violent, suffocating, morose, and given the context we live in today, so they should be. However, at the core of Scott’s practice is a lightness of touch and a neurotic intimacy with the world she encounters, ensuring the imagery and compositions at play here operate in the thin boundary between the grotesque and seductive.

Samara is also currently showing in London in the group exhibition Mixing it up at The Hayward Gallery from 9th September – 12 December. Samara Scott (b. 1985, London, UK) lives and works in Dover. Recent solo exhibitions include The Doldrums, CAPC Musée d’ Art Contemporain, Bordeaux, France (2020); Belt and Road, Tramway, Glasgow (2018). Silks, Eastside Projects, Birmingham, (2015); Recent group exhibitions include Soft Water Hard Stone: 2021 Triennial, New Museum, New York (2021) Mixing it Up, The Hayward Gallery, 2021; The Happy Fact, curated by Tania Pardo, La Casa Encendida, Madrid, (2019); Day Tripper, Focal Point Gallery, Southend-on-Sea, UK (2019); Days are Dogs, Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2017)

Courtesy of the artist and The Sunday Painter, London


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